National Citizen Service

George Friend facing away from camera wearing an NCS t-shirt

NCS

What is NCS?
The national citizen service (NCS) is a flagship government programme for young people aged between 15-17. Offering something for everyone, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to find your identity, take control of your life and channel your energy into making a real difference to your local community.

Adventure
Phase One is all about challenges. This week will be spent meeting some amazing new young people and living as a team away from home at an outdoor activity centre. You will work in groups of 12-15 in an adrenaline fuelled week of challenges and activities, e.g. canoeing/kayaking, gorge walking/ghyll scrambling, rock climbing and hiking. This is your chance to discover new things, make new friends and enjoy the freedom of being away from home.

Discovery
Phase Two sees you meet up with your team in a university style accommodation and living away from home. You will improve your life skills such as communication, leadership and self-confidence and develop your life skills, which all looks great on your UCAS statement and CV. You will have the opportunity to meet with organisations and important members from your local community and create links for future projects or even ideas for your own business/charity.

Social Action
This is where you can make a difference! All of the skills and experience you have gained and developed over the past two weeks all come together and you will have the opportunity to create your very own social action project. You will plan, fundraise and have the power to make a real change to your local community by delivering your project.

Celebration
It’s time to recognise and celebrate! Young people have the opportunity to celebrate their achievements and the achievements of their team in style. You will celebrate with your team during a graduation event where family and friends can come along to see the hard work and effort and hear the fun stories you all have to tell.

NCS doesn’t stop there
Once you have completed your four week programme you will become a part of a wide network of young people who have a range of opportunities both locally and nationally for graduates once their programme has finished. You can continue with social action projects or choose to help shape future participants programmes, the possibilities for volunteering and involvement are endless.

Contact Kelly on kelly.daley@mfcfoundation.co.uk or 07976246931


MFC Foundation Join Daughters And Dads Active And Empowered Project

We’re delighted to announce we will be part of the Daughters and Dads Active and Empowered project for the next two years.

Women in Sport, in partnership with the Fatherhood Institute, EFL Trust and the University of Newcastle (Australia), is excited to announce that we are the latest to join a growing band supporting this initiative.

We’ll join Leyton Orient Trust, The Albion Foundation (West Bromwich Albion), Foundation of Light (Sunderland AFC) and the Stoke City Community Trust for year two of the project, alongside Fulham FC Foundation, who were part of the project’s inaugural pilot year.

In total, six clubs will deliver the programme for the next two years, supported by Sport England’s Families Fund through National Lottery funding.

The Daughters and Dads Active and Empowered programme has been developed by the University of Newcastle (Australia) and Professor Philip Morgan and his team.

The programme aims to increase physical activity levels, sports skills and social-emotional wellbeing of girls 5-11 years by challenging stereotypes about playing sport and physical activity and increase fathers’ confidence and ability to act as role models in relation to their daughter’s participation.

Rachel Horsley, Girls Football Lead Officer here at MFC Foundation, said: The philosophy behind the programme is very much in keeping with many of our own. We reach across the area with many programmes, but this one is just that little bit different. Programmes like Daughters and Dads help everyone come together, not just the dads and their daughters. Some find it easier than others to show their feelings, or to actively support and encourage. This programme helps on so many levels. It helps emotionally and physically and brings an understanding that the two work together – just like dads and their daughters.”

Eleven families took part in the project’s inaugural year, and the programme had a great impact on those that took part.  Initial findings suggest:

  • Father and father-figures on the programme mentioned growing a stronger bond with their daughters and suggested they would increase the amount of family activity they do as a result of taking part.
  • All the girls that took part in the project showed a strong belief that girls are just as capable as boys at physical activity and should be able to enjoy the same opportunities, both individually and with their family.

Women in Sport and the project partners will explore these initial findings in greater depth with a larger sample size to understand any significant impact in year two and three.

Lee Warren, Innovation Manager for the DAD Project, said: We’re delighted to have five new clubs involved in this project for the next two years alongside continuing our partnership with Fulham who have built strong foundations. We’ve already started to see the impact that the Daughters and Dads Active and Empowered programme can have on its participants and the long-term lifestyle changes that it can deliver. We’re looking forward to seeing these clubs support more families in their local communities to get active.”

Mike Diaper, Executive Director Children, Young People and Tackling Inactivity, at Sport England said: Following a successful first year of testing the Daughters and Dads programme, we are really pleased that our National Lottery investment can now help to extend its reach into new areas across England.   We know that we need to continue to do more to help girls and less affluent families get active, and one thing that hinders this are gender stereotypes that can cause families to believe that physical activity is less important for girls than boys.  We also know that parents and carers often see their role as helpers and less as role models in encouraging their children to be active. This programme, based on a model from Australia, is addressing these challenges and we look forward to seeing the results of this in the North East, West Midlands and London.”

For more information on the Research and Advice Service and Women in Sport’s work visit www.womeninsport.org.